The AI Story

AI is critical to the future of health care and elder care

In North America and around the world, populations are getting older. By 2050, more than one in five people on the planet will be 60 years of age or older. Many of these older adults will develop serious and complex health conditions such as diabetes, osteoarthritis and chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. So we’ll see an increased demand for healthcare services.

At the same time, we are facing a shortage of skilled healthcare workers. AI-powered solutions such as Swift Skin and Wound help bridge human resource gaps by digitizing and automating clinical and administrative workflows. They also improve clinical response and decision making by alerting clinicians and administrators to patients who are at risk of deteriorating or developing new conditions. In addition, Swift Skin and Wound technology also analyzes trends across individual or multiple healthcare facilities to see if processes and treatment protocols are working or if they need to be improved.

How AI works on the Swift App

  1. Using the Swift App, the clinician captures an image of the wound
  2. Swift computer vision technology calibrates the image for scale, colour, lighting and 3D structure.
  3. Swift AI technology takes that image data and performs a semantic analysis of it, building an actual understanding of the wound
  4. Swift AI technology encodes actual wound care domain knowledge into the wound information
  5. The clinician is presented with screens that show the analysis, including wound measurements, colours, and healing over time

The role of smartphone cameras and AI

Until recently, smartphone cameras have focused on creating images that are pleasing to humans. Now phones are transitioning into computational photography – being manufactured to much higher quality standards, and are more highly calibrated so they can be used as machine vision cameras. Examples of such include the newer Apple iPhones that can measure 3D directly, or scan faces in 3D using the front facing cameras.

These newer cameras use what is called structured light (active imaging) to measure what the camera sees. When these become more readily available, it will spawn a whole new category of consumer uses, and from a medical perspective spur even more innovation of the type Swift specializes in. For instance, Swift chief medical office Dr. Sheila Wang is already using our Swift App with add-on infrared camera to analyze certain dermatological conditions in a way that isn’t possible with the human eye. Once IR and other types of image capture become readily available on smartphones, we can offer even more benefits to clinicians treating skin and wound injuries and conditions.

The role of smartphone cameras and AI

Until recently, smartphone cameras have focused on creating images that are pleasing to humans. Now phones are transitioning into computational photography – being manufactured to much higher quality standards, and are more highly calibrated so they can be used as machine vision cameras. Examples of such include the newer Apple iPhones that can measure 3D directly, or scan faces in 3D using the front facing cameras.

These newer cameras use what is called structured light (active imaging) to measure what the camera sees. When these become more readily available, it will spawn a whole new category of consumer uses, and from a medical perspective spur even more innovation of the type Swift specializes in. For instance, Swift chief medical office Dr. Sheila Wang is already using our Swift App with add-on infrared camera to analyze certain dermatological conditions in a way that isn’t possible with the human eye. Once IR and other types of image capture become readily available on smartphones, we can offer even more benefits to clinicians treating skin and wound injuries and conditions.

Technical Requirements for the Swift App

The Swift App works on iOS and Android devices. No extra attachments are needed, and you don’t have to have the latest devices either. For instance, we have customers using older Apple iPod devices to run the Swift App.